The order of the points listed below, does not necessarily indicate their relative importance.
1.    An umpire should move briskly around the table at all times, but should not appear to be unduly hurried.

2.        Make required calls (ie. “penalty two visits”), clearly and loud enough to be heard by both players and nearby spectators, but do not shout.

3 .    The umpire must be ready to provide to the players (upon request) the “rest’ or “spider” and to take possession of same from player after use - unless - such “rest” or “spider” is positioned on hooks at the side of the table.  Do not pick up such equipment until such time as it is asked for, thereby reducing the risk of having “coached“ the player.

4.    Do not walk around the table holding “rests”.  “spiders” etc. as a “staff of office”, leave aside until requested.

5.    Do not just let you eyes follow the run of the cue ball to the exclusion of all else.
Watch for fouls around the “cuff” area before and after the shot has been played, some players get very careless after the cue ball has been struck.

6.    Look for “danger” spots. (ie. places where the player may foul on a ball, in bending down over the table).     “Read” the game and try to anticipate what shot will be played next.
Recall if the player is right or left handed and it usually becomes obvious where you should position yourself to detect these type of fouls.

7.    When a player is “snookered” or is forced to “bridge” over other balls, try to attain a position so that you can see body fouls etc. but can also step quickly to the object ball.  Some player often “lay-up” a ball so gently, that you must be “right on top of it” to be able to give a correct decision.

8.    When a player is using a piece of equipment, watch for fouls on the underside of the cue against another ball.

9.    Do not stand in the players “line of sight”.  If you find yourself in the players “arc of vision” do not move whilst the shot is being played.

10.    When racking the balls prior to commencement of a frame, make sure the balls in the pyramid are as tightly packed as possible and that the black is over the “spot”.

11.    The question is often asked “where should the umpire stand to control the game”?  The answer is simple, there is no “set place”.  The players intended shot and mode of play in the first instance will dictate where the umpire should position themselves.  Factors that may affect an umpire’s choice of position are: -
a)    Balls that the player may foul.
b)    Time available to reach desired position.
c)    Trying not to stand continuously in from of one section of the audience.

12.    The prime function of the umpire is to control the game in all matters of fair and unfair play.
Knowledge of all rules and by-laws are vital.  The umpire must be in full control of the game at all times.

13.    Umpires should control spectators.  They should not be permitted to walk around tables, peering at possible shots.

14.    The way an umpire presents himself/herself is very important as it sets the standard for all  ie.
a)    Umpires should wear black slacks, and shoes (suitably pressed and clean), unless directed otherwise.
b)    Wear umpire shirt as designated by the state or national authority OR if no such directive given, a white shirt or suitably collared shirt.
c)    Hair should be kept neat and clean.  Facial growth (if worn) should be kept in a tidy manner. Make up (if worn) should be subtle.
d)    An umpire should present themselves to the organiser at least 10 minutes prior to time set down for commencement of play.  Double check with the organiser of any specific rulings, by laws etc. which may affect play.
e)    When speaking to players, spectators etc. the umpire should do so in a firm, clear, but friendly manner.
f)    An umpire should conduct themselves in the appropriate manner at all times, including end of play functions.

The following points are made as a guide to Umpire’s.  The order in which they are made does not necessarily indicate their relative importance.
The Umpire should be alert and pay attention to the game and the players – at all times – whilst the match is in progress.  Do not let your attention wander or engage in conversation or arguments.
An Umpire should move briskly around the table at all times, but should not appear to be unduly hurried.
Make all calls loud enough to be heard by both players and nearby spectators, but don’t shout loudly.
The Umpire should be courteous when talking to players and spectators alike, but firm and decisive with your decisions and calls.
Do not walk around the table holding the rest / spider like a “staff of office”, it has the tendency for umpire’s to lean on them and stand in one spot and also to relax and lose concentration – leave it aside until requested.
Do not let your eyes follow the run of the Cue Ball to the exclusion of all else.  Watch also for fouls around the “cuff area” after the shot has been played.  Some players become very careless after they have struck the Cue Ball.
Look for “danger” spots, i.e. places where the player may foul a ball in bending down over the table.  “Read” the game and try to anticipate what shot will be played next.  Remember whether the player is left or right handed and it usually becomes obvious where you should position yourself to see these types of fouls.
When a player is snookered, try to attain a position so that you can see body fouls etc. but can also step quickly to the object ball [the top players often “lay-up” a ball so gently, that you must be right on top of it to be able to give a correct decision in all cases].
When a player is using a “rest” watch for fouls on the underside of the cue/rest against another ball.
Do not stand in the player’s line of sight.  If anywhere in the player’s “arc of vision” don’t move while the shot is being played.
When racking up the balls prior to the start of a frame, make sure the balls in the triangle are as tightly packed as possible and that the eight-ball is as close to the spot as you can make it.
The question is often asked “where should to Umpire stand to control a game?”  Basically there is no “set place” in this sport.  The player’s intended shot and mode of play in the first instance will dictate where the Umpire should stand.
Other factors which will affect the Umpire’s chose of position are:-
     a]  Balls which the player may foul.
     b] Time available to reach the desired position.
     c] Trying not to stand continuously in front of one section of the audience.
However, as a guide only, keeping points a] to c] in mind:-
     i]   Assuming the player is right handed, one umpire would stand to his right hand side approx 1 metre away from the player.  This will give an umpire full view of any balls under the player’s body.
     ii] The other umpire should be almost diagonally across the table and should be viewing the bridging over balls and the tip of the cue for double hits etc. This way, both umpires and watching both areas where fouls can occur.  With a left handed player, the positions is reversed.
No player is permitted to leave the playing area at anytime during a game without having secured the Umpire’s permission to do so [this is not automatic].
Umpire’s should control onlookers and should not permit them to walk around tables, peering at possible shots.
The prime function of the Umpires is to control the game in all matters of fair and unfair play.
The Umpire is in full control of the game at all times.
Finally – you should always Umpire in the manner in which you would wish your own games to be Umpired.

Be AEBF accredited.  Carry accreditation card at all times.
Have pen and small notebook, Ball marker and Timer [that counts down and issues and audible alarm when time runs out].
Dress Code:  Black slacks / trousers / skirt, Black hose and Black Shoes.
Either long sleeve white shirt / blouse [with collar], or as directed / supplied.
Check with Head Adjudicator / Tournament Direction for the following:-
a]   Session times and ensure you arrive a minimum of 15 minutes earlier.
b]   Any tournament By-laws etc.
c]   Dress code requirements of participants.
Up-to-date with the Playing Rules and “Calling Procedures”.
Ensure all calls are made ‘loud [without shouting] and ‘clear’ i.e. 30 seconds, 2nd Visit, Total Snooker granted etc.
Remember that calls must be able to be heard by both players involved in the match and the second Umpire [if one is used].
No doubt should be in anyone’s mind of what your call was / is.
Be polite in handling any queries of a player, but do not let a player continually question you during a frame.   If you are doing your job, they shouldn’t have to. If they do not know the rules, that is not your problem.
Do not remain static around the table.  It is in your best interests and the players for you to be ‘on the move’ checking out scenarios [balls touching cushions etc.].
If you are ‘on the move’ you will find that:-
a]   Your concentration level remains higher.
b]   You will be better able to predict the players option of play
c]   You will be able to check areas that may be a problem when the next shot is played, without alerting the player.
Once a player ‘goes down’ to play a shot, remain stationary.
Position yourself opposite the Baulk Line when a shot is to be played from baulk either on the Break or after a foul shot.  You cannot just guess whether the Cue Ball is in Baulk or on the Baulk Line
Do not retain possession of ‘rests, spiders’ or the like, dispose of them as soon as possible.
Do not hesitate to make calls regarding Loss of Frame,  Coaching and Breach of Spirit if they occur.  It is what is required of you.
Enjoy the match and leave it, knowing you did a good job.

General
At the commencement of each fixture you will be issued with a timer, a ball marker. Return these to the adjudicator at the end of the match.
There is a jigger and a spider under each table. Check that these are in place before and after each frame so that time-outs to access a rest are not be required.
For tight snookers where an extra cue ball or string is required, an adjudicator must be called.
If an adjudicator is required, do not leave the table. If you cannot catch the attention of an adjudicator, ask someone to get one for you.

Team Fixtures
2 tables - 1 umpire per table.
Team managers record results.
Each team has a minimum of 5 minutes practice before the match commences. In some cases practice times will vary, example  being 10 minutes. The adjudicator will call the practices.
The adjudicator will instruct the umpires take control of the tables at the end of the second team’s practice. You should have 5 minutes to brush the table and rack the balls and clean the cue ball.
The adjudicator will call time running for the first match. If the table is not ready, call time running once the table is ready.
Adjudicator calls
‘Home Team first 5 minutes practice’ followed by
‘Please change over, Away Team 5 minutes pratice’ followed by
‘Umpires please table control of the table’
During each round, as each frame is completed:
rack the balls;
clean the cue ball and place it against the top ‘baulk’ cushion (or hand it the player);
call time running.
At the end of the last frame of each round:
start one timer for 5 minutes;
brush the table;
rack the balls;
retain possession of the cue ball;
after five minutes, clean the cue ball and place it against the top ‘baulk’ cushion
call time running for both tables.
At the end of the match:
brush the table;
rack the balls & clean the cue ball;
return the timer and ball marker the adjudicator.

General
At the commencement of each match, you will be issued with a timer, a ball marker and (for singles matches only) a spare cue ball. Return these to the adjudicator at the end of the match.
There is a jigger and a spider under each table. Check that these are in place before and after each frame so that time-outs to access a rest are not be required.
For tight snookers where an extra cue ball or string is required, an adjudicator must be called.
If an adjudicator is required, do not leave the table. If you cannot catch the attention of an adjudicator, ask someone to get one for you.

Singles Events
Score Sheets are issued by the adjudicator, mark the break sequence, complete the score sheet in full.
The first break is determined by lag. Subsequent breaks alternate.
Each player has a 5 minutes practice. The adjudicator will call and time the practice for the first matches of the session. You must time practice for subsequent matches.
At the end of the second players practice:
brush the table;
rack the balls;
hand each player a cue ball for the lag.
After the lag, clean one cue ball and place it against the top ‘baulk’ cushion (or hand it the breaking player, then call time running.
At the end of each frame:
record the result;
rack the balls;
announce the score;
clean the cue ball and place it against the top cushion (or hand it the breaking player);
call time running.
At the end of the match:
announce the result;
have each player sign the score sheet;
brush the table;
rack the balls and clean the cue ball;
return the timer, spare cue ball, ball marker and score sheet the adjudicator.

Lagging for the Break
Both players start with cue ball in baulk (umpires will be issued a spare cue ball).
Players play the cue ball down the table to rebound off the bottom ‘rack’ cushion back towards baulk.
Both cue balls must be played before the first ball reaches the bottom cushion or the lag is replayed.
The cue ball must not touch any of the side cushions, but may hit the top ‘baulk’ cushion.
The winner is the player who’s cue ball is closest the top ‘baulk’ cushion

1.    Have a folder containing complete WEPF/AEBF Playing rules [A4 size – makes referring to
    it easier].
2.    Have an enlarged A4 copy of the Flow Chart.  Is advisable to have a few spares, one
    can be issued to the association/league to copy for their members.
3.    Have copy of Interpretations on Playing Rules.
4.    As always, it’s best to start at the beginning, and run through the entire Rules, paying
    particular attention to the following:- [not necessarily shown in order].
    a]   The Break and the various situations ie. Black Ball potted on the Break;
          Legal Break but Cue Ball potted;   Deciding colours off the Break.
    b]   Playing from Baulk – requirements – ball ‘in’ Baulk, not on the line; Positioning
          by the Umpire to ensure they can see this, without making it obvious to the player.
    c]   Deciding Colours – after the Break.
    d]   What constitutes a Legal Shot [when in doubt, always refer back to this rule].
    e]   Timing, when it starts and finishes, player requirements after final shot of that visit.
     f]   Balls off Table, what happens next and how.
    g]   Determining a Total Snooker – what to look for [ie. straight line shot, must be able
           to hit some part of own ball.  Not just if a part of it can be seen].
    h]   Determining a Foul Snooker / Foul Jaw Snooker – again, what to look for [other balls
          of the player], cushions are deemed not to exist in determining a Foul Snooker.
    i]   Touching Ball – ie. Cue Ball resting against a Ball On [player’s own ball].  Explain the
                options open to the player and what umpire call should be when a touching ball occurs.
    j]   Balls Falling without being Hit – Rule T explain in detail.
    k]   Serious Fouls and why, although the penalty is 2 visits, they are different to the Serious
          Standard Fouls.
    l]   Calling Procedures – remember to stress this area, these ‘calls’ are part of the Rules
         and should make accordingly – near enough is not good enough!
    m]  Rule X, particularly in relation to double umpiring.  Both are umpires, if they see a foul
          they call it, not wait to see if the other umpire does it.   Does it really matter if you both
                 call the same foul.    Shows the players, you are both ‘on the ball’ and are aware, at all
          times, what is happening on the table.  Cuts down on player querying calls too.

Preparation, as in all things, is vital to conducting successful examinations, regardless of numbers.
1.    Your examination papers [the part containing the questions for the candidate], should
    be presented properly and be able to be re-used many, many times.
    To achieve this I advise the following:-
    Place [back to back] each set of pages in a plastic protective sleeves, then into a clear front
    display folder [the cheap variety].
    On the outside side of the display folder clearly mark the number of that examination set.
    [best done 1 of 10 / 2 of 10 or whatever the number of examinations sets you have.
I found it handy to have at least 2 sets of display folders in different colours red / blue.
This way the Candidate often thought there were 2 different exam papers and it was
useless cheating off the person sitting next to them.  Slipped inside the front cover should be the Candidates Answer Sheet [the one they write on].
Have another qualified umpire [maybe a “C” grade, looking to go further] along with you.   They are then learning how things should be done and will be able to assist you in the ‘marking’ of the completed examinations.
2.    You should also have an Attendance Sheet, which lists the Candidates Name, what league
    /area they are from and the number of the examination set you have given them.
This is vital, allowing you to check that all examination folders are returned to you along
with the Candidates Answer Sheet.   Never let an examination folder or answer sheet
leave the room except with you.
3.    Have plenty of pens [working] with you – a kid’s pencil case is ideal.
    You, as examiner should have a red biro for marking purposes.
    You also will have a timer which you will set at 1 hour, after you have given them time
    to fill out their name and details.
4.    Ready, set go.    Remind them that they are only to write on the Answer Sheet.
Occasionally you will have a candidate who asks questions [be careful you do not disturb others, or inadvertently give away the answer].
    Give them a warning about 15 minutes, before the hour is up.   Quite a few will not need
    the required hour, but there will be those who do.   Lack of literacy can be a problem.
5.    As the candidates finish their paper, they should return the folder and answer sheet to you.
You, or your off-sider should commence to ‘mark the answer sheet’ in red biro.
A tip – only mark those answers that they gave incorrectly – inserting what should have
been the correct answer alongside.
On completion of the ‘marking’, call the person back to you.   Tell them either they failed
or passed [congratulating a pass].  Send them ‘off to the side’ with folder and answer sheet
so they can assess where they went wrong [sometimes simple as not reading the question
correctly].   This way even if they missed out, they are still learning how and why.
Just passing and/or failing is not the be all and end all, of the process.
Advise them, if they still have a problem, to come back to you so you can further explain.
Remind them they cannot take any paperwork relating to the examination away.
6.    38 – 44 is a “D” grade accreditation.     45 – 50 is a “C” grade theory accreditation [some
    will be happy with that and not wish to ‘go further’, others will wish to try out for their “C”
    grade accreditation.  If this is the case, advise [and follow up] that you will contact them
    regarding when / where you will next be conducting “C” grade practical testing.
    I.e.   Finals,  State Title Try Outs, major tournament etc. etc.
7.    Check you have all your relevant paperwork.   Pack up and go home, hopefully with
some new accreditations.

AEBF ARUC Development 2017